Tailoring The Groom

Tailoring The Groom

Tailoring the Groom

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Tailoring The Groom-  the most common mistakes
1) Not Beginning Party Design with the End in Mind
Have your bridesmaid’s, groom and groomsmen colors and cloth samples that are actually part of a print design. This can be done by having mens ties made from the print or even starting with men’s ties and choosing one of the colors for the bridesmaids dresses. This strategy works to not running around at the final week and settling for less than your due excitement. Looking average is the last impression you want to make. Don’t forget, no one will criticize, its not worth it, so you have to feel right about your choices. Prints materials can be bought and brought to a tailor or dressmaker to be made into men’s ties and hankies. Great tailors will have tie sets in stock for the best men. Just plan ahead ironically by with either going to a fabric shop for a print that can work as a tie, such as heavier silk or see the men’s designs and colors already made that have one nice color in it for your girls.
2) Ordering Suits on-line If You Want Consistent Fit
Because everybody is different there will always be one in the party that does not fit as well as the rest. On-line order taking, most often do not offer more than 10 measurements. Many tailors that may take the measurements will only give basic measures. In this way they are less likely to be blamed for problems when cut elsewhere. Unless they are actually suitmakers they may be out of practice in doing so.
3)
Ordering your Men’s Tailoring from an Inexperienced  ordertaker

Good tailoring is not a profession to take lightly when you are paying more than $300.  When tailoring the groom, order takers can not assure each garment will fit as well as the next.  Wrinkles on suits suggest poor tailoring, haste and cheapness. This happens even though you may have ordered ahead of the tailor’s timeline.
Many salesmen are great talkers but lack the experience. Authentic tailors or tailoring-designers are few and most do not have the patience nor exercise the people skills to design and coordinate colors along with all the options in a man’s outfit to coordinate. You are creating something from nothing beware of premeditated expectations and remember Murphy’s Law. If something can go wrong it will. Tailoring is a very human and vulnerable occupation when you customers have high expectations and little experience.